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Archive for the 'Speak Japanese' Category

Did you know 何名様ですか。 (Nan-mei-sama desu ka?) means ‘How many people?’

Did you know 何名様ですか。 (Nan-mei-sama desu ka?) means 'How many people?'

When you go out in Japan you can expect to be asked this phrase.

This is the polite way of asking how many people are in your party. When responding, instead of using the term 名様 (mei-sama) you should say (number of people) plus 人 (nin).

三人です。(San-nin desu.): Three people.

P.S. Get Your Daily Dose of Japanese with 1-Minute Mini-Lessons
The Daily Dose of Japanese is a Calendar that gives you new, 1-minute lessons every day. Why? Because learning a little every day is easy, strengthens your habits and motivation and you improve your Japanese over time. Lessons range from culture and holidays to grammar, slang, phrases and more. Find it in the Japanese Resources menu or in the Quick Links menu on your Dashboard.

Click here to check out the Daily Dose of Japanese Calendar.

好きな日本のミュージシャンは誰ですか。 Who’s your favorite Japanese musician?

Who's your favorite Japanese musician?

(dare): who

Answers from our users:

  • HYDE and GACKT
  • ONE OK ROCK
  • Utada Hikaru, AKB48, and UVERworld!

Who’s your favorite Japanese musician?

Click here and share your story!

P.S. Get Your Daily Dose of Japanese with 1-Minute Mini-Lessons
The Daily Dose of Japanese is a Calendar that gives you new, 1-minute lessons every day. Why? Because learning a little every day is easy, strengthens your habits and motivation and you improve your Japanese over time. Lessons range from culture and holidays to grammar, slang, phrases and more. Find it in the Japanese Resources menu or in the Quick Links menu on your Dashboard.

Click here to check out the Daily Dose of Japanese Calendar.

あなたを、もっともよく表現している日本語の形容詞は何ですか。 What’s the Japanese adjective that represents you the best?

What’s the Japanese adjective that represents you the best?

形容詞 (keiyōshi): adjective

Answers from our users:

  • Kakkoii
  • かわいい
  • 楽しい

What’s the Japanese adjective that represents you the best?

Click here and share your word!

P.S. Get Your Daily Dose of Japanese with 1-Minute Mini-Lessons
The Daily Dose of Japanese is a Calendar that gives you new, 1-minute lessons every day. Why? Because learning a little every day is easy, strengthens your habits and motivation and you improve your Japanese over time. Lessons range from culture and holidays to grammar, slang, phrases and more. Find it in the Japanese Resources menu or in the Quick Links menu on your Dashboard.

Click here to check out the Daily Dose of Japanese Calendar.

日本語であなたの名前は何ですか。 What’s your name in Japanese?

What's your name in Japanese?

名前 (namae): name

Answers from our users:

  • ケイテリン、でも私は小春が好きです。小春と呼んでください。
  • My Japanese name is ケイト・キング (Kate King).
  • My Japanese is Riho (里穂).

What’s your name in Japanese?

Click here and share your story!

P.S. Get Your Daily Dose of Japanese with 1-Minute Mini-Lessons
The Daily Dose of Japanese is a Calendar that gives you new, 1-minute lessons every day. Why? Because learning a little every day is easy, strengthens your habits and motivation and you improve your Japanese over time. Lessons range from culture and holidays to grammar, slang, phrases and more. Find it in the Japanese Resources menu or in the Quick Links menu on your Dashboard.

Click here to check out the Daily Dose of Japanese Calendar.

忘れ物を探しているんですが。 I’m looking for something I lost.

I'm looking for something I lost

Please keep an eye on your belongings! But, if you do lose something, use today’s phrase!

  • 忘れ物を探しているんですが。 (Wasuremono o sagashite iru n desu ga.) - I’m looking for something I lost.
  • いけない!お財布を忘れた! (Ikenai! O-saifu o wasureta!) - Oh no! I forgot my wallet!

P.S. Get Your Daily Dose of Japanese with 1-Minute Mini-Lessons
The Daily Dose of Japanese is a Calendar that gives you new, 1-minute lessons every day. Why? Because learning a little every day is easy, strengthens your habits and motivation and you improve your Japanese over time. Lessons range from culture and holidays to grammar, slang, phrases and more. Find it in the Japanese Resources menu or in the Quick Links menu on your Dashboard.

Click here to check out the Daily Dose of Japanese Calendar.

誕生日は、いつですか。 Do you know how to answer this question?

Do you know how to answer this question?

誕生日 (tanjōbi): birthday

Here is how to ask about someone’s birthday:

  • 誕生日は、いつですか。When is your birthday?

Here are some ways to answer this question:

  • 8月22日です。It’s August 22nd.
  • 5月30日です。It’s May 30th.
  • 9月3日です。It’s September 3rd.

When is your birthday?

Click here and leave your answer!

P.S. Get Your Daily Dose of Japanese with 1-Minute Mini-Lessons
The Daily Dose of Japanese is a Calendar that gives you new, 1-minute lessons every day. Why? Because learning a little every day is easy, strengthens your habits and motivation and you improve your Japanese over time. Lessons range from culture and holidays to grammar, slang, phrases and more. Find it in the Japanese Resources menu or in the Quick Links menu on your Dashboard.

Click here to check out the Daily Dose of Japanese Calendar.

お気に入りの趣味は何ですか。 What is your favorite hobby?

what is your favorite hobby?

趣味 (shumi): hobby

Here are some hobbies from our users:

  • Learning languages.
  • Running while listening to JapanesePod101.
  • Shashin o toru koto desu ka? Ii desu ne!!

What is your favorite hobby?

Click here to share your hobby!

P.S. Get Your Daily Dose of Japanese with 1-Minute Mini-Lessons
The Daily Dose of Japanese is a Calendar that gives you new, 1-minute lessons every day. Why? Because learning a little every day is easy, strengthens your habits and motivation and you improve your Japanese over time. Lessons range from culture and holidays to grammar, slang, phrases and more. Find it in the Japanese Resources menu or in the Quick Links menu on your Dashboard.

Click here to check out the Daily Dose of Japanese Calendar.

バス停を探しているんですが。 I’m looking for the bus stop.

I'm looking for the bus stop

This is a very useful phrase if you want to use the public transportation in Japan:

  • バス停を探しているんですが。 (Basutei o sagashite iru n desu ga): I’m looking for the bus stop.

Before you get on the bus, you should make sure that the bus goes where you want to go:

  • すみません。このバスは[place name]に 行きますか。(Sumimasen. Kono basu wa [place name] ni ikimasu ka.) - Excuse me. Does this bus go to [place name]?

P.S. Get Your Daily Dose of Japanese with 1-Minute Mini-Lessons
The Daily Dose of Japanese is a Calendar that gives you new, 1-minute lessons every day. Why? Because learning a little every day is easy, strengthens your habits and motivation and you improve your Japanese over time. Lessons range from culture and holidays to grammar, slang, phrases and more. Find it in the Japanese Resources menu or in the Quick Links menu on your Dashboard.

Click here to check out the Daily Dose of Japanese Calendar.

何歳ですか。 Do you know how to answer this question?

Do you know how to answer this question?

何歳ですか。 (Nan-sai desu ka?): How old are you?

Here are some ways to answer this question:

  • 18歳です。 - I’m 18 years old.
  • 25歳です。 - I’m 25 years old.
  • 60歳です。 - I’m 60 years old.

How old are you?

Click here and leave your answer!

P.S. Get Your Daily Dose of Japanese with 1-Minute Mini-Lessons
The Daily Dose of Japanese is a Calendar that gives you new, 1-minute lessons every day. Why? Because learning a little every day is easy, strengthens your habits and motivation and you improve your Japanese over time. Lessons range from culture and holidays to grammar, slang, phrases and more. Find it in the Japanese Resources menu or in the Quick Links menu on your Dashboard.

Click here to check out the Daily Dose of Japanese Calendar.

5 Ways To Improve Your Japanese Speaking Skills

5 Ways To Improve Your Japanese Speaking Skills

Speaking is usually the #1 weakness for all Japanese learners. This is a common issue among language learners everywhere. The reason for this is obvious: When language learners first start learning a language, they usually start with reading. They read online articles, books, information on apps and so on. If they take a class, they spend 20% of their time repeating words, and 80% of the time reading the textbook, doing homework or just listening to a teacher. So, if you spend most of your time reading instead of speaking, you might get better at reading but your speaking skills never grow. You get better at what you focus on.

So if you want to improve you speaking skills, you need to spend more of your study time on speaking. Here are five tips to help you get started:

1. Read out loud
If you’re listening to a lesson and reading along, read out loud. Then re-read and speed up your tempo. Do this again and again until you can speak faster. Try your best to pronounce the words correctly, but don’t obsess about it. Read swiftly, emote and put some inflection on the sentences. Reading aloud helps to train the muscles of your mouth and diaphragm to produce unfamiliar words and sounds.

Read out loud!

2. Prepare things to say ahead of time.
As you may know from experience, most learners run out of things to say. But, if you prepare lines ahead of time, you won’t be at a loss for words in conversations. This will help you not only to learn how to say the words, but how to say them in the right context. A good way to prepare yourself before conversations is with our Top 25 Questions Series, which teaches you how to ask the most common conversational questions, and how to answer them, in Japanese:

Click here to learn the top 25 Japanese questions you need to know. .

3. Use shadowing (repeat the dialogues as you hear them).
Shadowing is an extremely useful tool for increasing fluency as well as improving your accent and ability to be understood. Shadowing helps create all the neural connections in your brain to produce those words and sentences quickly and accurately without having to think about it. Also, as mentioned in tip #1, shadowing helps develop the muscle memory in all the physical parts responsible for the production of those sounds. Depending on what your primary and target languages are, it’s quite likely that there are a lot of sounds your mouth just isn’t used to producing. Shadowing can be done, for example, when watching TV shows or movies or listening to music.

Each one of our lessons begins with a dialogue. Try to shadow the conversation line by line, and you’ll be mastering it in no time.

Click here to for a FREE taste of our Absolute Beginner series!

4. Review again and again.
This is the key to perfection, and we can’t emphasize it enough. Most learners don’t review! If you review and repeat lines again and again, you’ll be speaking better, faster and with more confidence.

Review again and again

5. DON’T BE AFRAID TO MAKE MISTAKES!
You’d be surprised by how many people try to avoid talking! The more you speak, the faster you learn – and that is why you’re learning Japanese. Practice speaking every chance you get: whether it’s ordering coffee, shopping or asking for directions.